China Tours & Private Packages - Discover the mistery of China with a Local China Travel Agency(TTC)

You are here: Home » China Travel Guide » Chinese Food Guide » Eastern China Taste - Eastern Chinese Food

Eastern China Taste - Eastern Chinese Food

Eastern China Taste remains a favorite among locals. Despite some seeking alternatives, The shrimp and broccoli dish is a particular favorite among customers.

EASTERN CHINESE FOODS
 

Recommended 14 special delicacies in East China

The late autumn in East China is not only rich in humanities but also quiet and leisurely in ecology. Although the late autumn in East China is not as rough and sophisticated as the north, it is full of charm and poetry. The late autumn in East China is the wind and frost of the wanderer's clothes, and the freshness of the moonlight falling on the lotus pond, carrying the dreams of countless people. Travel Tour China has compiled 5 special food recommendations in East China for foodies as follows:

Dongpo pork (Dōngpō ròu)

Dongpo pork (Dōngpō ròu)
 

The traditional Hangzhou's trademark dish of red-cooked pork belly, Dōngpō ròu, is built with a handful of Chinese staple ingredients like ginger, scallions, soy sauce and, most importantly, Shàoxīng rice cooking wine, an essential ingredient for red-cooked meals.

The meat (with the skin on) is typically browned in fat, simmered twice, braised, sautéed, and finally steamed, after which it becomes so amazingly tender it can be pulled away with chopsticks. Dōngpō ròu is said to have been invented (or at least inspired) by Su Dongpo, an 11th-century Song Dynasty statesman, poet, artist, calligrapher, and one of the four classical Chinese gastronomes.

Xiaolongbao

Xiaolongbao
 

Xiaolongbao are soup-filled dumplings originating from the 19th-century Nan Xiang, what is today Shanghai's Jiading district. It is believed that the first form of xiaolongbao was sold by Huang Mingxian, a shop owner who wanted to evolve the classic dumpling due to the increased competition of neighboring vendors.

The dumplings are usually filled with a large volume of soup and minced pork, then steamed in a specially-designed bamboo steamer. Sometimes, xiaolongbao can also be filled with crab or shrimp meat. The dough is quite thin, and it is believed that it should be thicker than tang bao, but not as thick as shen jian bao.

Scallion pancake (Cong you bing)

Scallion pancake (Cong you bing)
 

Scallion pancake is a Chinese unleavened flatbread made from wheat flour which is folded with oil and finely minced scallions. Bell peppers, fennel, and sesame seeds are some of the ingredients that are also often included in this pancake. It is usually served piping hot, cut into pieces or wedges, and served with a soy-based sauce.

Although the origins of scallion pancake are still quite murky, most people believe that it originated in Shanghai, due to the fact that scallion pancakes are very similar to the Indian paratha flatbread. Because of its unique flavor and texture, scallion pancake is one of the most popular street food items in China and Taiwan.

Stir-fry shrimps (You bao xia)

Stir-fry shrimps (You bao xia)
 

Stir-fry shrimps or you bao xia is a Chinese dish where whole shrimps are stir-fried in a wok until crispy. They are then soaked in a savory sauce that typically consists of chicken broth, black vinegar, sesame oil, sugar, and Shaoxing wine.

Scallions and ginger slices are often used during the cooking process, but they might also be used as garnishes before the dish is served. Stir-fry shrimps are especially popular at Chinese New Year celebrations.

Yangzhou fried rice (Yang zhou chao fan)

Yangzhou fried rice (Yang zhou chao fan)
 

Yangzhou fried rice is a Chinese dish consisting of rice, eggs, and vegetables such as carrots, mushrooms, peas, while the common additions also include shrimps, meat, scallions, and Chinese ham. Traditional versions sometimes may incorporate sea cucumbers, crab meat, and bamboo shoots.

It is believed that the dish originates from General Yang Su of the Sui Dynasty. Because it was one of his favorite dishes, he introduced it to the Yangzhou culture when he patroled Jiangdu with Emperor Yangdi. Originally, it was a peasant food prepared with leftover rice combined with small bits of meat and vegetables.

Zhajiangmian

Zhajiangmian
 

Zhajiangmian is a Shandong specialt, consisting of wheat noodles in soybean sauce and vegetables such as summer radish and sliced cucumbers. The sauce is usually made by cooking ground pork or beef in combination with fermented soybean paste. There is also a vegetarian version of the dish that substitutes the meat with smoked tofu in the production of the sauce.

Although the dish is native to China, it was embraced by the Koreans 100 years ago, when it was introduced to them by Shandong immigrants. In Korea, the dish is known as ja jang myun, and it is extremely popular because it is cheap, convenient, and casual.

Shaobing

Shaobing
 

Known as a common snack food in Northern China, shaobing is a type of layered flatbread, typically topped with sesame seeds. It is made with multiple layers of dough brushed with sesame paste and resembles a flattened bread roll. Shaobing originated in the Shandong province, but today it can be found at numerous street stalls throughout the country.

In fact, depending on the region, shaobing can be enjoyed in many different ways. In southern China, it is a popular breakfast choice, served with soy milk or tea and often stuffed with sweet fillings such as red bean, black sesame, or jujube (red date) paste.

Oyster omelette (Háo jiān)

Oyster omelette (Háo jiān)
 

Oyster omelette originated in the city of Chaozhou (Teochew) and the region of Fujian in China. It is a signature dish of the Hokkien people - Chinese diaspora in Taiwan, Malaysia, Singapore, Indonesia, and the Philippines. The dish consists of small oysters added to a mixture of potato starch and egg batter.

Depending on the region, cooks will sometimes add a dash of spicy chili sauce mixed with lime juice to intensify the taste of the whole dish. The city of Tainan in Taiwan is even unofficially called the snack city, especially because it offers one of the best oyster omelettes in the region - unsurprisingly so, because its coastal location ensures that it is never in lack of fresh oysters.

Lion's head (Shīzitóu)

Lion's head (Shīzitóu)
 

Contrary to what one might think upon hearing the name of the dish, lion's head is a meal consisting of big pork meatballs that are stewed with noodles and vegetables such as cabbage. It dates back to the times of the Sui Dynasty, when Emperor Yang took a trip to Yangzhou and made his chefs prepare a dish that was inspired by the Yangzhou landscapes, which he loved.

The meatballs looked similar to the Chinese guardian lion's head, so the name stuck until today. In China, there are two versions of the dish - one is served in a rich, brown sauce (Zhenjiang variety), and the other in a lighter broth (Yangzhou variety).

Tea egg (Cháyèdàn)

Tea egg (Cháyèdàn)
 

Despite its unusual name, tea is not the dominant flavor in tea egg, a popular, traditional snack item that originated in Zhejiang, but is found throughout China. The snack consists of an egg that is hard-boiled in (usually black) tea, soy sauce, and numerous spices such as anise, cinnamon, cloves, fennel, and peppercorns, which add a savory, slightly salty note to a normal egg.

Tea egg is usually sold by street vendors, but it can also be found in numerous Chinese markets and Asian restaurants. It is commonly consumed on its own or served with accompaniments such as noodles or rice. Traditionally, tea eggs are eaten during Chinese New Year, symbolizing wealth, prosperity, and fertility.

Moo shu pork (Mu xu rou)

Moo shu pork (Mu xu rou)
 

A Northern Chinese dish known as moo shu pork is a seasoned meat and vegetable stir-fry that is also an integral part of American-Chinese cuisine. Traditionally, slices of pork tenderloin, cucumbers, and scrambled eggs are stir-fried in peanut or sesame oil after which day lily buds and thinly sliced wood ear and enokitake mushrooms are added to the pan.

The seasoning in moo shu pork consists of minced ginger and garlic, scallions, soy sauce, and rice wine. The dish is typically accompanied by rice. Although it is most often stated that moo shu pork comes from the Shangdou province, there are numerous theories about the origin of the dish and its name.

One of the most popular varieties of the dish is made with gravy, called moo shu lu, and it is usually served with noodles and soft tofu for breakfast. In the 1960s, moo shu pork became popular in the United States but in a slightly tweaked version compared to the original, namely in the amount and versatility of the additional ingredients.

Vegetables like cabbage, carrots, onions, bell peppers, and many more that have been cut up into thin strips are commonplace, while rice wine is often substituted with sherry. The American-Chinese version comes served with a side of hoisin sauce and a couple of Mandarin pancakes because the dish is meant to be eaten like a taco.

Pepper bun (Hu jiao bing)

Pepper bun (Hu jiao bing)
 

Hújiāo bǐng is a street food delicacy that is believed to have originated in Fuzhou, Fujian. This filling snack consists of a bun that is stuffed with sliced scallions and minced or finely chopped meat, preferably marinated fatty pork cuts.

Pepper bun (Hu jiao bing)
 

The buns are usually sprinkled with sesame seeds before they are baked in clay ovens. Apart from China, pepper buns are also popular in Taiwan where they are traditionally sold by street vendors of Fujian descent.

Hokkien fried rice (Fuk gin caau faan)

Hokkien fried rice (Fuk gin caau faan)
 

Hokkien fried rice is a popular Chinese rice dish originating from the province of Fujian. In order to prepare it, rice and eggs are first stir-fried together, then topped with a thick gravy made with poultry, dried mushrooms, seafood, and vegetables.

It is recommended to fry the ingredients over high heat, because if the wok isn’t hot enough, you will end up with watery fried rice.

Recommended

Top 4 China Tours chosen by most customers to explore in the best way. Check the detailed itinerary, or tailor your own trip now with us.

We are here to help you...
Start planning your tailor-made with 1-1 help from our travel advisors.

3.8138

Create Your Trip

INQUIRY